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Airlines Urged by U.S. to Give Notice to China

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Airlines Urged by U.S. to Give Notice to China

WASHINGTON — Just hours after China scrambled fighter jets to enforce its newly declared air defense zone, the Obama administration decided on Friday to advise American commercial airlines to comply with China’s demands to be notified in advance of flights through the area.

                                           

While the United States continued to defy China by sending military planes into the zone unannounced, administration officials said they had made the decision to urge civilian planes to adhere to Beijing’s new rules because they worried about an unintended confrontation.

Although the officials made clear that the administration rejects China’s unilateral declaration of control of the airspace over a large area of the East China Sea, the guidance to the civilian airlines could be interpreted in the region as a concession in the battle of wills with China.

“The U.S. government generally expects that U.S. carriers operating internationally will operate consistent with” notice requirements “issued by foreign countries,” the State Department said in a statement, adding that that “does not indicate U.S. government acceptance of China’s requirements.”

The decision contrasted with that of Japan’s government earlier this week, when it asked several Japanese airlines, which were voluntarily following China’s rules, to stop, apparently out of fear that complying with the rules would add legitimacy to Chinese claims to islands that sit below the now contested airspace. China’s newly declared air defense zone, experts say, is designed mainly to whittle away at Japan’s hold on the islands, which it has long administered.

On Saturday, a Japanese Foreign Ministry official said, “We will not comment on what other countries are doing with regard to filing flight plans.” It was not immediately clear if the Obama administration had notified Japan, a close ally, of its decision.

The American decision drew criticism from some quarters. Stephen Yates, a former Asia adviser to Dick Cheney when he was vice president, said it was “a bad move” that would undercut allies in the region that take a different stance. “We should be guided by their preferred approach,” Mr. Yates said.

But Strobe Talbott, a former deputy secretary of state under Bill Clinton and now president of the Brookings Institution, said it was important to avoid an accident while drawing a firm line. “The principal option is to be extremely clear that disputes” over territory “must be resolved through diplomacy and not unilateral action,” he said.

The American announcement came on the same day Chinese state news media said that China sent jets aloft and that they identified two American surveillance planes and 10 Japanese aircraft in the air defense zone the country declared last weekend. Although there was no indication that China’s air force showed any hostile intent, the move raised tensions.

Earlier in the week, the United States sent unarmed B-52s into the area, and they proceeded unimpeded. China then appeared to back down somewhat from its initial declaration that planes must file advance flight plans or face possible military action.

The administration’s decision on Friday underscored the delicate position President Obama finds himself in, drawn into a geopolitical dispute that will test how far he is willing to go to contain China’s rising regional ambitions.

China’s move thrust the United States into the middle of the already prickly territorial clash between Beijing and Tokyo, a position the administration had avoided for months even while reiterating that it was treaty-bound to defend Japan if it were ever attacked. After the Chinese declaration last weekend, American officials feared that, if left unchallenged, the Chinese action would lead to ever greater claims elsewhere in the Pacific region.

But with planes flying so fast and in such proximity, the administration’s worries grew that an accident or an unintended confrontation could spiral out of control. A midair collision between a Chinese fighter jet and an American spy plane off the coast of China in 2001 killed the fighter pilot and forced the spy plane to make an emergency landing on Hainan island, setting off a diplomatic episode until Beijing released the American crew and sent the plane back, broken into parts.

“Crowded air lanes increase the chances for an unwanted incident,” said Jon M. Huntsman Jr., Mr. Obama’s first ambassador to China. “The challenge here, as with April 2001, is when you have an unexpected crisis, things escalate very, very quickly without any plans for de-escalation. That’s one of the big challenges we have in the U.S.-China relationship.”

One of the biggest challenges for Mr. Obama will be navigating the complicated personalities of leaders in Tokyo and Beijing. Prime Minister Shinzo Abe of Japan, a strong nationalist, has vowed to stand firm against any Chinese encroachments, while President Xi Jinping of China has recently taken over as leader and has promised to advance a strong foreign policy meant to win his country more recognition as an international power.

The two countries have been at odds for years over the uninhabited islands known as Diaoyu by the Chinese and Senkaku by the Japanese. The United States does not take a position on the dispute, but it has said that an attack over the islands would be covered by its mutual defense treaty with Japan.

Although administration officials believe Chinese actions are mainly meant to give it an advantage in its struggle with Japan over the islands, experts on Asia say they also fit China’s larger goal of establishing itself as the dominant power in the region, displacing the United States.

Administration officials said they decided to proceed with routine military training and surveillance flights so as not to legitimize China’s assertion of control over the airspace or encourage it to establish a similar air zone over the South China Sea, where it has territorial disputes with Vietnam, Brunei, Taiwan and the Philippines. China had said it expected to set up other air defense zones, and experts said they expected one to cover that sea.

“We don’t want this to be the first in what would be a series of assertive moves,” said an administration official, who insisted on anonymity to discuss a delicate diplomatic matter. “The whole area’s fraught.”

Mr. Obama is sending Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. to the region next week, when he will meet with both Mr. Xi and Mr. Abe as well as South Korea’s leader. Although the trip was previously scheduled, it will put Mr. Biden in the center of the dispute at a difficult moment, and aides said he would deliver a message of caution to both sides to avoid escalation.

Many countries, including the United States and Japan, have air defense zones, but the coordinates of the Chinese zone overlap those of Japan, South Korea and Taiwan.

Peter Dutton, the director of the China Maritime Studies Institute at the United States Naval War College in Newport, R.I., said the new air zone also gives China a legal structure to intercept American surveillance flights in international airspace, which have long irritated Beijing.

“It is clear that the Chinese do not seek regional stability on any level,” Mr. Dutton said. “They intend to be disruptive in order to remake the Asian regional system in accordance with their preferences.”

The Chinese sent jets on patrol into the contested airspace on Thursday, but the flights on Friday appeared to be different, with the state news media indicating the jets were scrambled specifically to respond to foreign jets in the area.

Original Post found here: http://www.nytimes.com/2013/11/30/world/asia/china-scrambles-jets-for-first-time-in-new-air-zone.html?pagewanted=2&_r=0

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UK, China and Russia ‘tapped Merkel’s phone’

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This is just comedy at this point. Now not only is known that The United States tapped German prime minister Angela Merkel’s phone, apparently the UK, China, Russia, AND North Korea did as well!

It was not just the US – Britain, Russia, China and North Korea were also tapping Chancellor Angela Merkel’s mobile phone, German security services believe, according to magazine reports.

Focus magazine said an analysis by German security services showed Merkel’s calls were listened into by even more people than initially thought.

It said analysis by German security services showed the four countries, and not just the US, were eavesdropping.

The British Embassy in Berlin declined to comment on the allegations.

Relations between Germany and the US have turned chilly since it was alleged that its National Security Agency (NSA) has been tapping Merkel’s phone, possibly from a listening station on top of the US embassy which is just a few hundred metres away from the Chancellor’s office in the centre of Berlin.

In early November the Independent newspaper reported that the British embassy housed a similar spy station on its roof.

Focus, meanwhile, also reported that as well as targeting Merkel’s phone, Russian spies were particularly active in Germany with 120 agents operating in the country.

US officials arrived in Berlin on Monday to meet the German foreign minister over the NSA spying scandal.

One of the officials said the United States was taking German outcry over revelations of American spying on Europeans seriously, ahead of his visit to soothe frazzled ties.

Congressman Gregory Meeks told Handelsblatt newspaper that US-German relations were “of enormous importance” and must be stronger and closer still.

“We want the Germans to know that we don’t take their anger lightly,” Meeks said in comments reported in German and made before his trip together with Senator Chris Murphy, who chairs the Foreign Relations Subcommittee on European Affairs.

They were scheduled to meet the German foreign and interior ministers on Monday before heading to Brussels on Tuesday.

Germans have reacted angrily to revelations that emails, phone calls, web searches and other data may have been hoovered up by US intelligence agents, as part of widespread espionage that has also strained Washington’s ties with other partners.

After meeting the US delegation Monday, Thomas Oppermann, the Social Democrats’ parliamentary group leader and chairman of the secret service oversight committee, said the US espionage affair was “not over”.

“We expect further light to be shed,” he said, adding there had been agreement between the parties “that the completely out-of-hand practice of bugging by the NSA must finally have limits”.

Merkel called in parliament last week for answers over “grave” US spying accusations which, she said, were testing transatlantic ties, including fledgling US-EU trade talks.

“We understand the German fears,” Meeks said, adding that US President Barack Obama was also “very concerned”.

“For this reason he’s having checked which secret service methods are reasonable and which are not,” he added.

Original Post found here: http://www.thelocal.de/20131125/five-countries-tapping-merkels-phone